Art on the Street – August 2013

Tedd Hucks and Paul Caleb at Gallery in the Attic in Peterborough and a brief tour of the graffiti of downtown Peterborough

Works by Paul Caleb and Tedd Hucks are on display at Gallery in the Attic in Peterborough until August 31
Works by Paul Caleb and Tedd Hucks are on display at Gallery in the Attic in Peterborough until August 31

The sculptural artwork of artist Tedd Hucks is likely little known, as Tedd is mostly known for his tattoo work. His visual art literally lives on many residents of Peterborough and the world.

For his show at Gallery in the Attic, Tedd has created visceral sculptures that are jarring and comforting at the same time. Incorporating real wild animal skulls, ornamental plaques, and lighting fixtures, Tedd has amassed a body of work that welcomes viewers — and might haunt them.

Really though, Tedd’s sculptures are quite whimsical.

The juxtaposition of skulls with ornate wood frames and painted treatments — and, in the case of one piece, a dripping faucet — invoke a western domestic sense with northern soul. They’re wonderful.

Tedd Hucks' juxtaposition of skulls with ornate wood frames and painted treatments invoke a western domestic sense with northern soul
Tedd Hucks' juxtaposition of skulls with ornate wood frames and painted treatments invoke a western domestic sense with northern soul
Incorporating real wild animal skulls, ornamental plaques, and lighting fixtures, Tedd's work both welcomes viewers and might haunt them
Incorporating real wild animal skulls, ornamental plaques, and lighting fixtures, Tedd's work both welcomes viewers and might haunt them
Paul Caleb's newer works compile repeated photographic textures in a kaleidoscope fashion, which are then mounted into window frames
Paul Caleb's newer works compile repeated photographic textures in a kaleidoscope fashion, which are then mounted into window frames

Paul Caleb has been painting for some time. His works have shown at Gallery in the Attic before, but mostly in group shows. This is our first time seeing his works in a group alone, and they present a stark contrast to Tedd’s adjacent sculptures.

Paul plays on a renaissance feel, portraying light, striking hands, and earth tones that leave the viewer with a sense of enlightenment. In a biblical way, these works are imbued with mystery and a tone that’s something special to take in.

Paul’s newer works compile repeated photographic textures in a kaleidoscope fashion, which are then mounted into window frames as a sort of “holding line”. These are quite distinct and stand up quite well on their own.

The exhibition runs through August 31 at Gallery In the Attic (140 1/2 Hunter St. W., Peterborough).


The graffiti scene in Peterborough is somewhat lacking, but some smaller pieces jump out like "Observer" ( located just west of the intersection of Water and Hunter Street)
The graffiti scene in Peterborough is somewhat lacking, but some smaller pieces jump out like "Observer" ( located just west of the intersection of Water and Hunter Street)

A brief graffiti tour of downtown Peterborough

It’s summertime and the time is right for a walking tour. While tickets for Donald Fraser’s “Farm To Table” locavore food tour are hard to come by, it’s easy and free to take a tour of the graffiti of local alleyways.

That being said, the graffiti scene in Peterborough is somewhat lacking. There are some nice commercial pieces that some would consider more as murals. But some smaller pieces stand out for me and, once you’ve walked the back alleys of the downtown core, these will jump out for you too.

Here’s a selection of pieces that speak to me, for whatever reason: their charm, message, colour, or tone. Our streets do have character — you just need to find it.

In the alleyway west of the Sapphire Room, you’ll find a sort of working collage of bits and pieces. Pac Man, alongside a few other odd stencilled works, combine to become something bigger than each individual piece.

Just west of the intersection of Water and Hunter Streets is where you’ll find a floating head with another person perched atop who appears to be using a spray can. It’s quirky for sure. The adjacent text — which reads “Observer” in an obscure red type — only adds to the mystique.

You can find this collage in the alleyway west of the Sapphire Room on Hunter Street
You can find this collage in the alleyway west of the Sapphire Room on Hunter Street
The We Live Here Too logo can be found in a few locations in downtown Peterborough
The We Live Here Too logo can be found in a few locations in downtown Peterborough
"ANTOINE!" is in the alleyway south of Hunter Street by the Bell Canada parking lot
"ANTOINE!" is in the alleyway south of Hunter Street by the Bell Canada parking lot
Though not strictly graffiti, this mural in the alley behind the BMO building at Simcoe and Water is an abstract staple of the Water Street landscape
Though not strictly graffiti, this mural in the alley behind the BMO building at Simcoe and Water is an abstract staple of the Water Street landscape

Positive messaging is found in a few locations in the downtown via the reproduction of the We Live Here Too logo. This grassroots movement is dedicated to the notion of making all spaces queer-positive, youth-focused, and accessible to all persuasions.

The logo is formed from two hands making a “W” out of two peace signs. It’s good messaging and nice to see (make sure to check out weliveheretoo.tumblr.com).

Though not strictly graffiti, the delapitated piece in the alley behind the BMO building at Simcoe and Water Street has always attracted me. It’s not particularly well executed, but its colour blends and dot-dash patterns make it an abstract staple of the Water Street landscape. It’s a keeper — though it’s starting to crumble, as the rock wall it’s painted on is slowly degrading.

Lastly, “ANTOINE!” resides in the alleyway south of Hunter Street by the Bell Canada parking lot. I’m not really sure what his deal is, but the message above reads “You Can’t Age If You Haven’t Lived” — which seems reasonable to me.

All photos by Jeff Macklin.

Comments