Native trees planted at Peterborough Regional Health Centre to honour front-line healthcare workers

Otonabee Conservation is planting 5,690 trees throughout the Peterborough area this fall with five community partners

Paul Finigan (front) and Pat Kramer (back) from Otonabee Conservation plant native shrubs at Peterborough Regional Health Centre on October 21, 2020. The tree planting, which honours the hospital's front-line healthcare workers, is one of six tree plantings with five community partners that Otonabee Conservation is hosting over the fall. In all, Otonabee Conservation will be planting 5,690 trees. (Photo courtesy of Otonabee Conservation)
Paul Finigan (front) and Pat Kramer (back) from Otonabee Conservation plant native shrubs at Peterborough Regional Health Centre on October 21, 2020. The tree planting, which honours the hospital's front-line healthcare workers, is one of six tree plantings with five community partners that Otonabee Conservation is hosting over the fall. In all, Otonabee Conservation will be planting 5,690 trees. (Photo courtesy of Otonabee Conservation)

In the latest in a series of tree-planting events this fall, Otonabee Conservation planted 78 native trees and shrubs on Wednesday (October 21) near the staff entrance at Peterborough Regional Health Centre (PRHC) — honouring the hospital’s front-line healthcare workers.

“Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, the generosity of our community has been overwhelming,” said Brenda Weir, vice president and chief nursing executive at PRHC.

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“Planting these new trees outside the health centre will be appreciated by our healthcare professionals, support staff and volunteers, and also by the patients and visitors who are here at the hospital every day. Thank you to Otonabee Conservation and TD for this thoughtful show of support.”

TD provided funding for the planting, as part of their commitment to supporting those who are most impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. The City of Peterborough also supported the planting by providing compost and mulch to promote tree health and growth.

The native species planted include white spruce, which provides excellent shelter for wildlife according to Otonabee Conservation, and fragrant sumac, a drought-tolerant shrub known for its brilliant red fall foliage. Both species will support natural diversity and wildlife habitat on the PRHC property, and in time, will create shelter and a windbreak for employees accessing the staff entrance.

Otonabee Conservation's Kerry Norman plants a white cedar tree at the Harold Town Conservation Area, in the Township of Otonabee South Monaghan just outside of the City of Peterborough, on October 20, 2020. (Photo: Karen Halley / Otonabee Conservation)
Otonabee Conservation’s Kerry Norman plants a white cedar tree at the Harold Town Conservation Area, in the Township of Otonabee South Monaghan just outside of the City of Peterborough, on October 20, 2020. (Photo: Karen Halley / Otonabee Conservation)

“Trees provide countless benefits from filtering the air we breathe, to regulating temperatures, and providing shelter for wildlife,” explained Dan Marinigh, chief administrative officer for Otonabee Conservation.

“Planting trees, which are symbols of life and growth, is an ideal way to acknowledge front-line healthcare workers who are working tirelessly to care for our community during the pandemic, and always,” Marinigh added.

The PRHC planting is one of several Otonabee Conservation is hosting over the fall with five community partners to celebrate National Forest Week, which took place in September.

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Trees have already been planted at Siemens Peterborough (1954 Technology Dr.) on September 30th and at Harold Town Conservation Area, in Otonabee South Monaghan Township just outside Peterborough, on October 20th.

Additional plantings will take place at Meadows Stormwater Pond (2327 Marsdale Dr.) on October 22nd and 23rd, at Brock Mission (217 Murray St.) on October 26th, and at the Towerhill South Stormwater Pond (south of Walmart) from October 28th to 30th.

In all, Otonabee Conservation will be planting 5,690 trees, which will sequester more than 1.2 million kilograms of carbon over their lifetime. The initiative is supported with funding from Tree Canada, TD, Forests Ontario, and One Tree Planted.

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