Jacobs family receives first-ever Habitat For Humanity home built at Curve Lake First Nation

Second home of 'Maawandoonan – Coming Together in Partnership' project is now under construction

Members of the Jacobs family in front of their new home at 76 Quinquish Road in Curve Lake on April 28, 2019. The home was made possible through a partnership between Curve Lake First Nation and Habitat for Humanity Peterborough & Kawartha Region. (Photo courtesy of Habitat for Humanity Peterborough & Kawartha Region)
Members of the Jacobs family in front of their new home at 76 Quinquish Road in Curve Lake on April 28, 2019. The home was made possible through a partnership between Curve Lake First Nation and Habitat for Humanity Peterborough & Kawartha Region. (Photo courtesy of Habitat for Humanity Peterborough & Kawartha Region)

The Jacobs family is now the proud owner of a new home, courtesy of a partnership between Curve Lake First Nation and Habitat for Humanity Peterborough & Kawartha Region.

On Sunday (April 28), Tanya and Duane Jacobs, along with their four children and one grandchild, received the keys to their new detached home at 76 Quinquish Road at Curve Lake Lake Nation, an Anishinaabe community located approximately 25 kilometres northeast of Peterborough. The dedication ceremony was attended by around 80 people.

“To our family, a Habitat home means we can finally see our dreams coming true,” Tanya said. “We can say this is our home and be proud of it.”

Prior to taking ownership of their new Habitat home, the Jacobs family had been renting a small three-bedroom home with one bathroom in Curve Lake. The rental home needed new windows and doors, a new roof, and other necessary repairs.

This is the first Habitat home built at Curve Lake Lake Nation as part of the ‘Maawandoonan – Coming Together in Partnership’ project (maawandoonan is the Anishinaabe word for ‘bring together’). The partnership is providing two lower income indigenous families with single detached homes built on two lots provided by Curve Lake First Nation.

The Jacobs family receiving the keys to their new home from Curve Lake First Nation Chief Phyllis Williams and Habitat for Humanity Peterborough & Kawartha Region during a dedication ceremony at  Curve Lake First Nation on April 28, 2019. (Photo courtesy of Habitat for Humanity Peterborough & Kawartha Region)
The Jacobs family receiving the keys to their new home from Curve Lake First Nation Chief Phyllis Williams and Habitat for Humanity Peterborough & Kawartha Region during a dedication ceremony at Curve Lake First Nation on April 28, 2019. (Photo courtesy of Habitat for Humanity Peterborough & Kawartha Region)

“This is the first indigenous housing partnership for Habitat Peterborough and Kawartha Region,” said the organization’s CEO Sarah Burke. “It marks a truly meaningful opportunity for both partners to impact the lives of lower income families living on traditional territory.”

As indigenous peoples have a deep spiritual and cultural connection to their land, building homes in an indigenous community must be undertaken with the support of the community. However, the same criteria apply for any family applying for a Habitat home: they must have a need for affordable housing, a willingness to partner, and demonstrate the ability to repay an interest-free mortgage geared to income.

The Jacobs family decided to partner with Habitat because they had been faced with many challenges when it came to obtaining a mortgage and buying a home on Curve Lake First Nation.

Tanya and Duane Jacobs of Curve Lake First Nation with their four children and their grandchild. Prior to receiving their Habitat home, the family has been living in a small rental home that needed repairs. To qualify for a Habitat home, the family had to demonstrate the ability to repay an interest-free mortgage geared to income and invest 500 hours of sweat equity by providing volunteer service.  (Photo courtesy of Habitat for Humanity Peterborough & Kawartha Region)
Tanya and Duane Jacobs of Curve Lake First Nation with their four children and their grandchild. Prior to receiving their Habitat home, the family has been living in a small rental home that needed repairs. To qualify for a Habitat home, the family had to demonstrate the ability to repay an interest-free mortgage geared to income and invest 500 hours of sweat equity by providing volunteer service. (Photo courtesy of Habitat for Humanity Peterborough & Kawartha Region)

As well as meeting the criteria for a home, the family also put in the mandatory minimum 500 hours of sweat equity by providing volunteer service on the build site, at the ReStore, and through other Habitat initiatives.

The Jacobs children are excited to have their own bedrooms and are looking forward to many sleepovers with their cousins and friends.

“This Habitat home means happiness,” Tanya says. “A place we can feel comfort, a place we can relax.”

Construction of the second home of the Maawandoonan project has already begun, and Habitat for Humanity Peterborough & Kawartha Region are currently recruiting volunteers.

For more information about Habitat for Humanity Peterborough & Kawartha Region, or to volunteer or to donate, visit habitatpeterborough.ca.

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