Neil Young exhibit in Lindsay about to close for good

Final day of Youngtown Museum exhibit at Olde Gaol Museum is September 10, collectibles will be for sale

Youngtown Museum founder Trevor Hosier with Neil Young back stage at the Air Canada Centre in Toronto in 2008. The Youngtown exhibit at the Olde Gaol Museum in Lindsay is closing for good on September 10, 2017, and Hosier will be selling some of the items from his collection. (Photo: Stephen Hosier)
Youngtown Museum founder Trevor Hosier with Neil Young back stage at the Air Canada Centre in Toronto in 2008. The Youngtown exhibit at the Olde Gaol Museum in Lindsay is closing for good on September 10, 2017, and Hosier will be selling some of the items from his collection. (Photo: Stephen Hosier)

There is a town in north Ontario
With dream comfort memory to spare
And in my mind
I still need a place to go
All my changes were there.

– “Helpless” by Neil Young

After a decade celebrating the music of Neil Young, the Youngtown Museum will be no more come September.

The exhibit at the Olde Gaol Museum in Lindsay will be closing for good on September 10, 2017 — and founder Trevor “T.R.” Hosier will be selling some of the items from his collection.

Hosier, who amassed memorabilia related to Neil Young and rock music over the years, originally created the Youngtown Rock ’n’ Roll Museum at 45 King Street East in Omemee in 2006 — only six buildings away from Young’s childhood home.

In September 2014, Hosier closed the private, volunteer-run museum and put the building up for sale because of the time and cost required for its upkeep.

The Youngtown Rock 'n' Roll Museum was originally located in Omemee, steps from Neil Young's childhood home. After founder Trevor Hosier closed the museum in 2014, the Olde Gaol Museum in Lindsay displayed a much smaller exhibit. (Photo: Trevor Hosier)
The Youngtown Rock ‘n’ Roll Museum was originally located in Omemee, steps from Neil Young’s childhood home. After founder Trevor Hosier closed the museum in 2014, the Olde Gaol Museum in Lindsay displayed a much smaller exhibit. (Photo: Trevor Hosier)

“It was a work of passion that we enjoyed for as long as we could,” Hosier says. “Costs and repairs mounted, forcing us to close although it had been enjoyed by thousands of visitors.”

After the museum closed, the Olde Gaol Museum in Lindsay agreed to host a much smaller version of the exhibit, which opened in March 2015.

However, the exhibit will be closing for good on Sunday, September 10th and Hosier will be there to sell a number of items from his collection, including:

Neil Young visited the Youngtown Rock 'n' Roll Museum in Omemee on October 7, 2010. (Photo: Brenda Hosier)
Neil Young visited the Youngtown Rock ‘n’ Roll Museum in Omemee on October 7, 2010. (Photo: Brenda Hosier)
  • Telecaster guitar signed by Crosby, Stills, Nash, & Young
  • Telecaster guitar signed by Buffalo Springfield band
  • Stratocaster guitar signed by Neil Young
  • various rare Neil Young posters, framed
  • Buffalo Springfield original vintage metal sign
  • rare Neil Young – Shepard Fairey framed artist proof print
  • rare Neil Young – Omemee Youngtown framed and numbered print
  • Youngtown Museum wooden Indian mascot “Chief Omemee”
  • Youngtown Museum guitar from front of Omemee museum
  • Neil Young – Greendale Train Set with Neil signed certificate
  • rare Neil Young signed Greendale poster
  • RIAA awards for “Decade”, “Long May You Run”, “Mirror Ball”.

The sale (cash only, no returns) takes place at the Olde Gaol Museum (50 Victoria Ave. N., Lindsay) from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sunday, September 10th. Prices will be presented on the day of the sale.

While the exhibit will be no more, Hosier says he plans to continue his celebration of Neil Young and Youngtown through a limited-run photo exhibition, featuring a presentation and photographs from the past decade. Follow the Youngtown Rock & Roll Museum Facebook page for updates.

Five-year-old Neil Young in August 1950, fishing from a wooden bridge over the Pigeon River in Omemee. (Photo: Harold Whyte)
Five-year-old Neil Young in August 1950, fishing from a wooden bridge over the Pigeon River in Omemee. (Photo: Harold Whyte)

The Young family moved to Omemee at the end of August 1949, when Neil was almost four years old. He lived there until he was 11 years old (it was where he contracted polio, during the 1951 epidemic). Young’s song “Helpless” is a tribute to his childhood in Omemee.

Many years later, his father — journalist and author Scott Young — returned to live in the area until he died in 2005.

Neil Young himself visited the Youngtown Museum in 2010, while it was still in Omemee, an event noted in the Toronto Star.

VIDEO: Neil Young revisits Omemee

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