Almost 800 fish rescued from Millbrook Dam

Along with crayfish and frogs, captured fish were released into Baxter Creek as part of Millbrook Dam Reconstruction project

Otonabee Conservation staff and volunteers (Meredith Carter, Dave Wood, and Jasmine Gibson) capturing fish from the Millbrook Dam spillway pool for transfer into Baxter Creek. Almost 800 fish were captured and released, along with more than 200 crayfish and a few frogs. (Photo courtesy of Otonabee Conservation)
Otonabee Conservation staff and volunteers (Meredith Carter, Dave Wood, and Jasmine Gibson) capturing fish from the Millbrook Dam spillway pool for transfer into Baxter Creek. Almost 800 fish were captured and released, along with more than 200 crayfish and a few frogs. (Photo courtesy of Otonabee Conservation)

Almost 800 fish, along with crayfish and frogs, that were living in a pool of water at the base of the Millbrook Dam spillway now have a new home.

The relocation of the fish, crustaceans, and amphibians was required as the pool is being drained for the reconstruction of the spillway, as part of the Millbrook Dam Reconstruction project.

On March 7, 2018, staff and volunteers with Otonabee Conservation — with the support of staff from the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (MNRF) — captured 797 fish and transferred them downstream into Baxter Creek.

The rescued fish represented nine species: 275 Brown Trout, 1 Brook Trout, 85 White Suckers, and over 400 Sculpin (Mottled and Slimy Sculpin species — commonly known to be trout food).

Staff from the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (Jason Runtas, Jackie Wood, and Scott Gibson) holding a Brown Trout, one of 797 fish rescued from the pool at the base of the Millbrook Dam spillway. (Photo courtesy of  Otonabee Conservation)
Staff from the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (Jason Runtas, Jackie Wood, and Scott Gibson) holding a Brown Trout, one of 797 fish rescued from the pool at the base of the Millbrook Dam spillway. (Photo courtesy of Otonabee Conservation)
Otonabee Conservation volunteer Dave Wood confirming the identification of a sculpin. (Photo courtesy of  Otonabee Conservation)
Otonabee Conservation volunteer Dave Wood confirming the identification of a sculpin. (Photo courtesy of Otonabee Conservation)

Staff and volunteers also captured and released more than 200 crayfish and a handful of frogs.

Those involved with the fish rescue included Meredith Carter, Erin McGauley, Jasmine Gibson, Terri Cox, and Doug Clifford from Otonabee Conservation, Dave Wood (a volunteer with Otonabee Conservation), and Scott Gibson, Jackie Wood, and Jason Runtas from MNRF.

The contractor, FACCA Inc., kept the worksite safe and provided assistance when needed.

From left to right: Watershed Biologist Erin McGauley, Volunteer Dave Wood, Watershed Management Program Manager Meredith Carter, Planning Ecologist Jasmine Gibson, and Risk Management Official/Inspector Terri Cox with Otonabee Conservation. (Photo courtesy of  Otonabee Conservation)
From left to right: Watershed Biologist Erin McGauley, Volunteer Dave Wood, Watershed Management Program Manager Meredith Carter, Planning Ecologist Jasmine Gibson, and Risk Management Official/Inspector Terri Cox with Otonabee Conservation. (Photo courtesy of Otonabee Conservation)

Comments